Caterina Ventrella

#Futurecamp Finale

In Uncategorized on April 28, 2010 at 6:09 pm

What can we take from our social media class into the world of corporate communications?

This was the final question me and some fellow Humber PR peers were forced to ask ourselves now that social media class is done. There was no shortage of responses and this didn’t come as a surprise. We’ve been having these conversations as we’ve been learning along the way, with guidance from social media and public relations gurus such as: Bob Pickard, SMOjoe, Mitch JoelErin Bonokoski Joseph Thornley.

So I decided to read in between the lines. After all of the classroom twitpics, hash tags, wordles, blogs,  profiles, tweets, Skype tutorials, slideshares and DIGGS  I came to the conclusion that the answer is confidence.

We ended our  future camp discussion with the conclusion that we can enter the world of corporate communications  with the confidence in knowing how to manage a company’s online presence in a way that will bring value to their brand.

In other words, mission accomplished Michael Cayley.  Humber’s first social media class was a success!

Take a look at what my peers had to say:

Andrew Bartucci Caitlin McNamee-Lamb Kara Merpaw Sayurie Naidoo

Bloggers Backstage

In Uncategorized on April 9, 2010 at 3:13 am

Being a backstage media volunteer for FDCC LG Fashion Week was tres cool for two reasons:

1 – backstage look at the magic and art that is fashion.

2 – the media-related tidbits I learned

….however my pretty PR eyes notice something interesting – bloggers backstage. Right beside the names of SunTv and Inside Fashion  on my holy grail of backstage access, were bloggers. And were not talking no Perez Hilton. No, not even names that big….check back in soon to see who I’m talking about.

Guest Blog: Tiger’s back – and so are his PR people!

In Uncategorized on April 9, 2010 at 2:56 am

There’s too much talk about Tiger …again, and the conversation is just too juicy to not join in. I’ve invited guest blogger Sayurie Naidoo to share her thoughts on the PR side of things.

 

What would be the best way to return to the public eye after a moment of shame and embarrassment – than to exploit your late father.

I know, I know. Everyone is jumping on the “Let’s hate on Tiger” bandwagon. And I’ll admit, it’s easy to jump on. The guy made a mockery of his family, his marriage and his public image.

Tiger’s return to the Master’s kicked off with a new TV ad from his loyal sponsor, Nike. The 30 second commercial features a pain-ridden Tiger, staring straight on at the camera while his late father’s voice echoes in the background. After the initial eeriness of this scene leaves you, it just seems like a desperate attempt for forgiveness. And maybe for a little sympathy, too.

But is this really such a bad thing? Tiger Woods is a full-blown celebrity. There is nothing typical about his life, nor has there ever been. Tiger Woods is also a brand. He is one of the world’s most powerful brands, owned by the PGA and Nike, two equally powerful corporations.

This brand can resist any storm. Because people truly like him. And they want him to succeed. They want to remember the good times, seeing the video of Tiger as a toddler. That Tiger can do no wrong.

For this reason, Tiger Woods, the brand, will do whatever it takes to be a success. Is this exploitation of his late father? No. It would be for the average person.

 But Tiger Woods is anything but average.